Archives for the tag “ 1995 ”

Stéphane Thibault >_

The Celtic population, while adopting many aspects of Roman material culture, maintained also many of its Celtic attributes. We have already seen that Jerome testifies to the continued use of the Celtic language among Treveri in the fourth century. Celtic religion too continued to flourish, alongside such imports as the imperial cult and the eastern cults, including Christianity, that soldiers and others introduced. Naturally the forms of the religion changed. Druids disappeared, but how important they had been, except in in aristocratic circles, is in any event disputed. Certainly their power and prestige did not long survive the end of Celtic independence, and Claudius actually proscribed them, Augustus having already forbidden Roman citizens to participate. Human sacrifice and head-hunting, which had been features of Celtic society in pre-Roman times, clearly did not survive the conquest either. But the popular religious beliefs and practices that can be shown still to flourish after the conquest, often in a strongly syncretistic form, must have had very deep roots. Celtic religion attached great importance to natural features considered to be sacred, such as mountains, springs and rivers, and there are many references to sacred groves.

Wells, Colin (1996 [1995]). « Celts and Germans in the Rhineland », dans Miranda J. Green (dir.), The Celtic World, ch. 31, Routledge, Londres et New York, p. 612.

Stéphane Thibault >_

Caesar, a political propagandist, not a trained ethnographer, uses three terms to refer to tribal groupings, namely “ Celts ”, also called “ Gauls ” in Latin, “ Germans ”, and “ Belgae ”, and any discussion of ethnicity involves us in trying to understand these terms. Caesar in the very first chapter of his work defines the German specifically as those “ who dwell across the Rhine ”, that is, east of the river, and seems to be trying to suggest as a result that the Rhine is a natural boundary. He also emphasizes the difference between the Celts and Germans, and insists upon the terror which the Germans inspire, “ by the huge size of their bodies, by their incredible courage and skill in arms ”. He argues, as it suits his political purpose, that if the Germans who had already invaded Gaul before he himself got there had not been checked and driven back across the Rhine where he claims they belonged, they might have overrun all Gaul and threatened Italy, “ as previously the Cimbri and Teutoni had done ”. The Cimbri and Teutoni had been turned back by Marius less than half a century before, so that there were Romans who could still remember the terror that they had inspired. It was a potential parallel.

[…]

Now if the cultural differences between Celts and Germans were as great as Caesar suggests, and if the Rhine indeed formed the ethnic frontier, we are entitled to expect corresponding differences in material culture to show up in the archaeological record, thus making the Rhine the archaeological frontier also. The fact is that they do not […]

[…]

The Belgae are either the key to the situation, or a confusing anomaly. […]

Wells, Colin (1996 [1995]). « Celts and Germans in the Rhineland », dans Miranda J. Green (dir.), The Celtic World, ch. 31, Routledge, Londres et New York, p. 606-607.

Stéphane Thibault >_

Bogs also served as foci for metalwork deposits. This practice was not restricted to Celtic people, and features for example in Germanic cult […]. The Gundestrup Cauldron, widely seen as the quintessential “ Celtic ” cult artefact, was in fact found in a bog in Himmerland, Denmark […]. Human remains are mainly known from Germanic contexts, but sometimes occur in Britain and Ireland. The Lindow bog body (Lindow Moss, Cheshire) is a recent example. Dating of the body is problematic […], but radiocarbon dates from the most recent analysis cluster around the first century AD […]. Lindow man suffered a threefold death (by axe blows, garrotting and cutting of the throat). Whether or not he was a victim of human sacrifice […], this triplication suggests a death with ritual links. Where datable, however, British bog bodies are mainly of bronze age or Roman date […], and their ritual associations unclear. The extent to which such deposits represent an iron age ritual phenomenon is thus uncertain.

Webster, Jane (1996 [1995]). « Sanctuaries and sacred places », dans Miranda J. Green (dir.), The Celtic World, ch. 24, Routledge, Londres et New York, p. 450.

Stéphane Thibault >_

At the beginning of history, around the middle of the first millennium AD [notre emphase], the country was wholly Celtic in its language and its institutions. For linguists, this can only have come about by means of a significant immigration of Celtic-speaking people at some time in later prehistory. Such an intrusion is not, however, reflected in the archaeological evidence. There is thus seeming conflict between the two disciplines.

[…]

There is little to suggest that the earliest phase of the Irish Iron Age may be regarded as “ Celtic ”, however that term is applied. The Hallstatt culture is represented in Ireland by little more than a scatter of insular variants of the continental Gündlingen-type sword, a handful of winged chapes and a few other items […]. None of these objects is iron with the rather doubtful exception of a corroded and fragmentary sword blade from the river Shannon at Athlone for which a Hallstatt date has been claimed […].

Raftery, Barry (1996 [1995]). « Ireland. A world without the Romans », dans Miranda J. Green (dir.), The Celtic World, ch. 33, Routledge, Londres et New York, p. 637.

Stéphane Thibault >_

Pythagore est un héros légendaire de la Grèce : être inspiré et démoniaque*, il était considéré par certains comme un intermédiaire entre les dieux et les humains. Le pythagorisme est une secte religieuse vouée au culte de Dionysos, le dieu du vin et de tout ce qui célèbre le délire de l’âme. La secte cherchait, par des initiations secrètes, à purifier l’âme de ses adeptes. Pour les pythagoriciens, l’initiation aux sciences — et tout particulièrement à la science des nombres — purifiait l’âme des initiés. Le groupe connut une division entre une tendance plus religieuse et superstitieuse (les akousmatikoi) et une tendance plus philosophique (les mathèmatikoi). Cette division était une manifestation de l’opposition entre la pratique religieuse et la philosophie. Ces derniers s’appelaient d’ailleurs, pour la première fois, des philosophes : des amis de la sagesse. À la différence des acousmatiques, le philosophe voit dans l’initiation à la connaissance rationnelle des nombres un moyen de purifier son âme et de se rapprocher de la perfection divine.

Carrier, André, Pierre Després, Marie-Germaine Guiomar et Ginette Légaré (1995). Apologie de Socrate, Introduction à la philosophie, Anjou (Québec), Centre Éducatif et Culturel inc., coll. « Philosophies vivantes », p. 111.

Stéphane Thibault >_

Les dialectes grecs se répartissent de la façon suivante :

  1. l’arcado-cypriote, qui comprend l’arcadien, le cypriote et le pamphylien et dont nous n’avons que des inscriptions.
  2. l’ionien-attique, qui comprend l’ionien d’Asie, l’ionien des îles et l’Attique [sic.]. C’est en Attique que s’expriment la plupart des grands prosateurs de l’époque classique (Thucydide, Platon, Xénophon, Isocrate, Lysias, Démosthène). Parmi les œuvres rédigées en ionien, on retiendra celle de l’historien Hérodote et celle du médecin Hippocrate.
  3. l’éolien, utilisé en Thessalie, en Béotie et dans l’île de Lesbos. C’est en lesbien que le poète Alcée et la poétesse Sappho ont rédigé leurs œuvres.
  4. le dorien, utilisé dans la plus grande partie du Péloponnèse, en Crète, dans le sud de l’Asie mineure (Halicarnasse, Cos), à Rhodes et en Grande-Grèce, notamment à Syracuse. L’une des plus grandes œuvres rédigées en dorien est celle du poète Pindare. Les Doriens représentent le dernier groupe des envahisseurs indo-européens : ce sont eux qui ont détruit la civilisation mycénienne et ont provoqué les migrations éoliennes et ionienne vers l’Asie mineure. Après leur passage, la Grèce continentale, plongée dans le chaos, connaît une éclipse de plusieurs siècles.

Au dorien se rattachent les parlers du nord-ouest : Phocide, Locride, Etolie, Epire [sic.].

Gravil, Jean-Louis et Claude Mauroy (1995). Le grec par les textes, 4e-3e et grands commençants : 1re année, avec la collaboration de Nicole Gravil, Baume-les-Dames (France), Magnard, p. 10.

Stéphane Thibault >_

L’histoire est connue. Minos roi de Crète a une femme, Pasiphaé, qui s’éprend d’un taureau et engendre un monstre mi-homme mi-taureau, le Minotaure. Pour enfermer celui-ci l’architecte Dédale construit à Cnossos un labyrinthe dont il est presque impossible de sortir. Minos réclame chaque année en tribut aux Athéniens l’envoi de sept jeunes garçons et sept jeunes filles qui doivent être offerts au monstre. Thésée, le fils du roi d’Athènes Égée, s’embarque parmi eux et grâce aux conseils de la fille de Minos, Ariane, réussit à tuer le monstre et à ressortir vivant du labyrinthe. Ainsi finit la sujétion d’Athènes envers Minos.

Ceci est un récit mythique raconté à des fins d’explication et de légitimation. Dans ce cas, il s’agit de doter le héros Thésée, ancêtre des Athéniens, de tout un cycle d’exploits (le meurtre du Minotaure en est un parmi d’autres) pour qu’il rivalise en importance avec un autre héros fort célèbre, Héraclès, dont se réclament d’autres cités grecques à l’époque classique et en particulier Sparte. Il faut se détourner de l’utilisation directement historique des mythes, leur interprétation est beaucoup plus complexe, ils ne sont en tout cas pas des chroniques historiques. Et l’on peut fort bien reconnaître le caractère extraordinaire pour l’époque de la présence des Crétois hors de leur île sans pour autant parler d’empire.

Orrieux, C. et P. Schmitt-Pantel (1995). Histoire grecque, Paris, PUF, p. 24.