Archives for the tag “ Celts ”

Stéphane Thibault >_

The Celtic population, while adopting many aspects of Roman material culture, maintained also many of its Celtic attributes. We have already seen that Jerome testifies to the continued use of the Celtic language among Treveri in the fourth century. Celtic religion too continued to flourish, alongside such imports as the imperial cult and the eastern cults, including Christianity, that soldiers and others introduced. Naturally the forms of the religion changed. Druids disappeared, but how important they had been, except in in aristocratic circles, is in any event disputed. Certainly their power and prestige did not long survive the end of Celtic independence, and Claudius actually proscribed them, Augustus having already forbidden Roman citizens to participate. Human sacrifice and head-hunting, which had been features of Celtic society in pre-Roman times, clearly did not survive the conquest either. But the popular religious beliefs and practices that can be shown still to flourish after the conquest, often in a strongly syncretistic form, must have had very deep roots. Celtic religion attached great importance to natural features considered to be sacred, such as mountains, springs and rivers, and there are many references to sacred groves.

Wells, Colin (1996 [1995]). « Celts and Germans in the Rhineland », dans Miranda J. Green (dir.), The Celtic World, ch. 31, Routledge, Londres et New York, p. 612.

Stéphane Thibault >_

Caesar, a political propagandist, not a trained ethnographer, uses three terms to refer to tribal groupings, namely “ Celts ”, also called “ Gauls ” in Latin, “ Germans ”, and “ Belgae ”, and any discussion of ethnicity involves us in trying to understand these terms. Caesar in the very first chapter of his work defines the German specifically as those “ who dwell across the Rhine ”, that is, east of the river, and seems to be trying to suggest as a result that the Rhine is a natural boundary. He also emphasizes the difference between the Celts and Germans, and insists upon the terror which the Germans inspire, “ by the huge size of their bodies, by their incredible courage and skill in arms ”. He argues, as it suits his political purpose, that if the Germans who had already invaded Gaul before he himself got there had not been checked and driven back across the Rhine where he claims they belonged, they might have overrun all Gaul and threatened Italy, “ as previously the Cimbri and Teutoni had done ”. The Cimbri and Teutoni had been turned back by Marius less than half a century before, so that there were Romans who could still remember the terror that they had inspired. It was a potential parallel.

[…]

Now if the cultural differences between Celts and Germans were as great as Caesar suggests, and if the Rhine indeed formed the ethnic frontier, we are entitled to expect corresponding differences in material culture to show up in the archaeological record, thus making the Rhine the archaeological frontier also. The fact is that they do not […]

[…]

The Belgae are either the key to the situation, or a confusing anomaly. […]

Wells, Colin (1996 [1995]). « Celts and Germans in the Rhineland », dans Miranda J. Green (dir.), The Celtic World, ch. 31, Routledge, Londres et New York, p. 606-607.

Stéphane Thibault >_

La Gaule, dans son ensemble, est divisée en trois parties, dont l’une est habitée par les Belges, l’autre par les Aquitains, la troisième par ceux qui dans leur propre langue se nomment Celtes, et, dans la nôtre, Gaulois. Tous ces peuples diffèrent entre eux par la langue, les coutumes, les lois. Les Gaulois sont séparés des Aquitains par le cours de la Garonne, des Belges par la Marne et la Seine. Les plus braves de tous ces peuples sont les Belges, parce qu’ils sont les plus éloignés de la civilisation et des moeurs raffinées de la Province, parce que les marchands vont très rarement chez eux et n’y importent pas ce qui est propre à amollir les coeurs, parce qu’ils sont les voisins des Germains qui habitent au-delà du Rhin et avec qui ils sont continuellement en guerre. Il en est de même des Helvètes, qui surpassent aussi en valeur le reste des Gaulois, parce qu’ils sont presque chaque jour aux prises avec les Germains, soit pour les empêcher de pénétrer sur leurs territoires, soit pour porter eux-mêmes la guerre dans leur pays (César, Guerre des Gaules, I, 1).

[…]

César demanda à ces députés quels étaient les peuples en armes, leur nombre et leurs forces ; il apprit « que la plupart des Belges étaient d’origine germaine ; qu’ils avaient jadis passé le Rhin, s’étaient fixés dans ces lieux à cause de la fertilité du sol, et en avaient chassé les habitants gaulois ; que seuls, du temps de nos pères, tandis que les Teutons et les Cimbres ravageaient toute la Gaule, ils les avaient empêchés d’entrer sur leurs territoires ; et que, par suite, ce souvenir leur inspirait une haute idée de leur importance et aussi de hautes prétentions militaires » (César, Guerre des Gaules, II, IV).

César (1964). La Guerre des Gaules, trad., préface, chronologie et notes par Maurice Rat, Paris, Garnier-Frères, coll. « GF Flammarion », n° 12, p. 13 ; 46.

Stéphane Thibault >_

Bogs also served as foci for metalwork deposits. This practice was not restricted to Celtic people, and features for example in Germanic cult […]. The Gundestrup Cauldron, widely seen as the quintessential “ Celtic ” cult artefact, was in fact found in a bog in Himmerland, Denmark […]. Human remains are mainly known from Germanic contexts, but sometimes occur in Britain and Ireland. The Lindow bog body (Lindow Moss, Cheshire) is a recent example. Dating of the body is problematic […], but radiocarbon dates from the most recent analysis cluster around the first century AD […]. Lindow man suffered a threefold death (by axe blows, garrotting and cutting of the throat). Whether or not he was a victim of human sacrifice […], this triplication suggests a death with ritual links. Where datable, however, British bog bodies are mainly of bronze age or Roman date […], and their ritual associations unclear. The extent to which such deposits represent an iron age ritual phenomenon is thus uncertain.

Webster, Jane (1996 [1995]). « Sanctuaries and sacred places », dans Miranda J. Green (dir.), The Celtic World, ch. 24, Routledge, Londres et New York, p. 450.

Stéphane Thibault >_

At the beginning of history, around the middle of the first millennium AD [notre emphase], the country was wholly Celtic in its language and its institutions. For linguists, this can only have come about by means of a significant immigration of Celtic-speaking people at some time in later prehistory. Such an intrusion is not, however, reflected in the archaeological evidence. There is thus seeming conflict between the two disciplines.

[…]

There is little to suggest that the earliest phase of the Irish Iron Age may be regarded as “ Celtic ”, however that term is applied. The Hallstatt culture is represented in Ireland by little more than a scatter of insular variants of the continental Gündlingen-type sword, a handful of winged chapes and a few other items […]. None of these objects is iron with the rather doubtful exception of a corroded and fragmentary sword blade from the river Shannon at Athlone for which a Hallstatt date has been claimed […].

Raftery, Barry (1996 [1995]). « Ireland. A world without the Romans », dans Miranda J. Green (dir.), The Celtic World, ch. 33, Routledge, Londres et New York, p. 637.

Stéphane Thibault >_

The Celts. Rich Traditions and Ancient Myths

Source : Barnes & Noble

For 800 years, a proud, vibrant, richly imaginative warrior people swept ruthlessly across Europe. The ancient Greeks called them “ Keltoi ” and honored them as one of the great barbarian races. Follow their fascinating story from their earliest roots 2500 years ago through the flowering of their unique culture and their enduring heritage today, enhanced with stunning reconstructions of iron-age villages, dramatizations of major historical events and visits to modern Celtic lands. This fascinating look back at the legends and legacy of the Celtic heritage is underscored by the hauntingly beautiful music of Enya.

[…]

Episode One
The Man with the Golden Shoes

Writer and narrator Frank Delaney takes us from the earliest remains of Celtic salt-miners in Austria, 2500 years ago, through the spread of their empire from Ireland to Hungary. Although the Celts were courageous, ruthless warriors armed with iron and mounted on horseback, their proud independence kept them from uniting against the disciplined military might of Rome.

BBC (2003 [1987]). The Celts. Rich Traditions and Ancient Myths, narration de Frank Delaney, DVD vidéo, deux disques, couleur, BBC Video, approx. 325 min.

Stéphane Thibault >_

L'Homme d'osier

« Certaines peuplades ont des mannequins de proportions colossales, faits d’osier tressé, qu’on remplit d’hommes vivants : on y met le feu, et les hommes sont la proie des flammes. »
César, Guerre des Gaules, VI, 16

« …ils construisaient aussi une représentation gigantesque de bois et de paille qu’ils brûlaient après l’avoir remplie de bétail et de toutes sortes de bêtes ainsi que d’être humains. »
Strabon, Géographie, IV, 4, 5

Au moins trois sources anciennes font référence à un type très particulier de meurtre rituel : un sacrifice par le feu où les victimes, enfermées dans un grand mannequin creux fait de paille ou d’osier, sont brûlées vives en offrande aux dieux. La cérémonie de l’Homme d’osier apparaît non seulement chez César et Strabon, mais aussi chez un commentateur de Lucain au IXe siècle.

Il est probable que Posidonius fut la source commune de César et Strabon. De même, le commentateur de Lucain dut avoir connaissance des deux premiers auteurs et regroupé leurs observations et celles de Lucain, quand il fait allusion aux trois dieux celtiques sauvages, Taranis, Esus et Teutatès, auxquels les sacrifices humains étaient étroitement associés […]. Le rite consistant à brûler des mannequins de paille (sans victimes, cette fois) s’est poursuivi jusqu’à une période récente dans les festivals de printemps de l’Europe post-païenne. En Allemagne, on brûlait des images d’« Homme Judas ».

Gravure du XIXe s. représentant un « Homme d’osier » que l’on remplit d’être humains destinés au sacrifice. À droite, un druide surveille l’opération, tandis que les victimes se lamentent sur leur sort.

Green, Miranda (2000 [1997]). Les druides, trad. de l’anglais par Claire Sorel, Paris, Éd. Errance, p. 75.

Stéphane Thibault >_

À part leurs apparitions dans les textes mythiques, ceux d’Irlande en particulier, il semble que pendant le Moyen Âge on n’ait pas porté de véritable intérêt aux druides, notamment en Angleterre. Mais dès le début de la Renaissance, la redécouverte de la littérature classique conduisit à une approche nouvelle du passé historique et des druides qu’évoquaient les textes anciens.

[…]

Cet esprit curieux [John Aubrey (1626-1697)] fut le premier à établir un rapprochement entre les druides et le site de Stonehenge, et c’est alors que débuta un courant d’interprétations qui a persisté jusqu’à nos jours. Aubrey n’a jamais idéalisé les druides ni romancé leur existence, mais, en l’absence d’une longue perspective préhistorique, il a prétendu que puisque les sites de Stonehenge et d’Avebury ne dataient pas de l’époque romaine, ils étaient sûrement pré-romains, et parce que c’était manifestement des temples, ils devaient être druidiques.

[…]

William Stukeley, né en 1687, fut médecin dans le Lincolnshire avant d’entrer dans les ordres en 1729 et de devenir le vicaire de Stamford. Il fut influencé par l’oeuvre d’Aubrey et, comme lui, établit un rapport entre les druides et les monuments mégalithiques — dont nous savons maintenant qu’ils remontent à une période de plus de deux mille ans antérieure à l’apparition du clergé celtique. En 1724, il publia son Itinerarium Curiosum, compte rendu de ses voyages à travers la Grande-Bretagne sur une période de quatre ou cinq ans dans lequel il affirme que les tertres funéraires du Néolithique et de l’Âge du Bronze sont à relier aux Celtes ou aux druides. L’intérêt de Stukeley pour les mégalithes était soutenu par une passion égale pour la religion ancienne, et il chercha même à établir un lien entre l’Ancien Testament, les druides et le christianisme.

Green, Miranda (2000 [1997]). Les druides, trad. de l’anglais par Claire Sorel, Paris, Éd. Errance, p. 140-142.

Stéphane Thibault >_

Dès le Ve siècle, l’Occident est à peu près entièrement celtisé, mais le dynamisme turbulent des Celtes les entraîne aussitôt vers d’autres conquêtes. Au début du IVe ils occupent l’Italie padane, y créant une nouvelle Gaule. La Gaule méridionale reçoit de nouveaux immigrants au IVe et au IIIe, les îles Britanniques et l’Espagne au IIIe. D’autres s’installèrent dans la vallée danubienne et jusqu’en Illyrie et en Thrace. Les bandes des Galates saccagèrent la Grèce au IIIe, avant de s’infléchir en Asie Mineure, où beaucoup se fixent définitivement en Galatie. À partir de 250, c’est au tour des Belges de conquérir tout le nord de la France et une partie de la Grande-Bretagne. À la fin de cette expansion, le Celtique comprend l’Allemagne jusqu’à l’Elbe, toute l’Europe moyenne de part et d’autre du Danube, les îles Britanniques, la France, l’Italie septentrionale, l’Espagne et le Portugal. La Scandinavie elle-même est toute pénétrée d’influences celtiques, dues en particulier aux importations d’oeuvres d’art. Aucun peuple de l’Europe n’est aussi puissant.

Dès le premier âge du Fer (époque de Hallstatt), la civilisation celtique s’était imprégnée profondément d’hellénisme, grâce à des relations établies depuis la Grèce par la voie danubienne, depuis l’Italie par les cols alpins, depuis Marseille par la vallée du Rhône. Le mouvement continue au second âge du Fer (époque de La Tène), surtout pendant les deux premières périodes (La Tène I : 450-250 et La Tène II : 250-100), où le monde celtique atteint son apogée. Un certain déclin se marque à La Tène III (Ier siècle). Les voies de pénétration restent les mêmes, mais l’expansion gauloise vers le Sud rend les contacts beaucoup plus aisés et féconds. Au reste la Celtique occidentale s’oriente de plus en plus vers la Méditerranée, et le sillon rhodanien, grande route de l’étain, retrouve, par-delà la coupure de l’époque classique, son importance de la période archaïque.

Lévêque, Pierre (1992 [1969]). Le monde hellénistique (Quatrième édition), Paris, Armand Colin, coll. « Agora », n° 230, p. 216-217.

Stéphane Thibault >_

Les langues celtiques semblent avoir été parlées dans toute la région située au nord des Alpes, de l’Europe centrale jusqu’à l’Atlantique. Le cas des Alpes est plus complexe, bien qu’il soit certain que l’Italie du Nord ait été de langue celtique. La zone orientale de ces langues est également assez difficile à définir. Au nord, en Scandinavie, on dispose de très peu de preuves, mais c’est là qu’apparaîtront plus tard les langues germaniques. La distinction entre Gaulois et Germains aurait été mentionnée pour la première fois par les géographes antiques vers 70 avant J.-C., mais elle existait sans doute déjà auparavant [notre emphase].

Renfrew, Colin (1990 [1987]). L’énigme indo-européenne. Archéologie et langage, trad. de l’anglais par Michèle Miech-Chatenay, Paris, Champs-Flammarion, p. 266.